The archive of exhibits below is from 2008 and 2009

James Hull was Curator from October 2008 - November 2009

Scroll down for Images and links to artists sites!

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346 Congress Street - Lobby Level, Fort Point - Boston, MA. 02210

 

 


Clint Jukkala

Boston Globe: Critic's Pick

Solo Exhibition: August 22 - November 7, 2009

Reception: Saturday, September 12, 4 - 6 PM

Artist talk and curator walk through of exhibit: Saturday August 29, 4 PM

Clint Jukkala, Vista (2009)

oil on canvas 70 x 75 inches

PDF of press release: Here / text only : Here

 

Clint Jukkala creates paintings through a systematic accumulation of structures inspired by the geometric landscape around him. The artist works with color intuitively, building up one area in response to another. This generates a  painterly style where  hand-rendered edges and lines wobble just enough to be active and dimensional. The clarity of chroma animates flatly painted shapes resulting in a transparent openness that differs from hard edged geometric abstractions. Expanding on the pixel-like characters and forms in his earlier work, Jukkala moves from the shallow space of the figure to emphasize the shifting objects and space around it. This complicates the formal logic of the paintings and engages the viewer by using color relationships to define ambiguous space.


Offset rectangles and sets of multicolored bands activate and define areas of the canvas. In Vista (2009) these active borders contain wider monochromatic bands of subtle stair step shading that lighten and appear to recede to a horizon. It is in these open, stage-like areas that the abstraction functions more representationally. The horizontal bands look like a green ocean under a cloudless, albeit purple, sky. The flatness of the surface and the paint application is undermined by the illusion of a real environment. When the border framing device is truncated, allowing the tonal bands to extend to the bottom edge of the canvas, the composition  seems to spill out into the space of the viewer. 


A change in Jukkala’s strategy is evident through the comparison of two types of very successful paintings.  Monument (2008) and Dazed (2009) firmly establish the artist’s trademark way of connecting geometric forms and “real things” through the use of lively, circuitous movement and vibrating color. The systematic use of only rectilinear shapes becomes a shorthand to reference the limitations of early computer graphics, weavings or embroidered decoration. In Monument (2008), color was used to dial up the intensity of the overall composition - as opposed to articulating a range of emotional energy, with some areas even a bit somber, as in Vista (2009) or Shift (2008). The increased scale of Vista (2009) allows the function of color to change from a descriptive to an expressive one with the aid of glowing light and atmosphere.


Other canvases stake out the territory between the deeper space of the open compositions and the jaunty, intensely patterned early works. In Shift (2008) rectangular frames stack and overlap vertically or horizontally and act as filters or tanks that cause whatever lies within them to be tinted or to glow. The layering requires a shallow space behind each lens in order for it to stack on top of and tint the one behind it. The outlined perimeters physically define each form moving us around the surface without inviting us very far into the tightly organized spaces. The compositional separation from the edges of the canvas and a Philip Guston-like directness with thickly brushed, simplified outlines results in an object-like presence. The convincing curiosity Clint Jukkala creates with emphatic color, believable form and illusionistic space is what activates our imagination and delivers rich associations rarely found in geometric abstraction.


James Hull, Curator


Clint Jukkala received a B.F.A. in painting from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1995 and an M.F.A. in painting from Yale University in 1998. He is represented by Envoy Gallery in New York, and his work has been included in recent exhibitions at the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and ZieherSmith Gallery in New York. He has also taught at the University of Connecticut and Quinnipiac University. Mr. Jukkala has taught at Yale since 2001. He is currently assistant professor of painting/printmaking at Yale and director of undergraduate studies in art.

 


 

Clint Jukkala, Shift (2008)

oil on canvas 21 x 18 inches

 

Clint Jukkala, Monument (2008)

oil on canvas 70 x 84 inches

Mr. Jukkala received a B.F.A. in painting from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1995 and an M.F.A. in painting from Yale University in 1998. He is represented by Envoy Gallery in New York, and his work has been included in recent exhibitions at the DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and ZieherSmith Gallery in New York. He has also taught at the University of Connecticut and Quinnipiac University. Mr. Jukkala has taught at Yale since 2001. He is currently assistant professor of painting/printmaking at Yale and director of undergraduate studies in art.

Artist's web site: http://clintjukkala.com

Press Images ( larger image files for print: Here)


Past exhibits:

Cristi Rinklin: Boundless

on view >> May 8 - August 15, 2009

Events: Saturday, July 11th:

>>>> Artist and curator "walk through" of exhibit and cocktail reception : 4 - 6 PM

Read review online >> Here

Cristi Rinklin - Boston Globe review by Cate McQuaid ( 7/15/2009) >>> PDF Here

Link to interview with Cristi in Big Red and Shiny: >>> Here

Opening reception for: Cristi Rinklin : Boundless (more pictures here)

Link to the artist's site: http://www.cristirinklin.com/

Press release: PDF here

Press images here (large files for print)

Cristi Rinklin

Boundless at FP3

FP3 is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new paintings by Boston artist Cristi Rinklin. Working in a medium with a
long history, Rinklin looks at how the carefully constructed illusionistic spaces of her antecedents were used to
inspire a sense of awe in the audience. The reverence of these viewers depended on a firsthand experience of vast
expanses of land, sea or sky as well as healthy respect for Nature’s fury. Cristi observes that as a contemporary artist
she spends increasingly more and more time looking at virtual worlds and cinematic versions of new fantastic
environments experienced online or in the theater. How does this new, often computer generated visual territory
impact the ability of painting to inspire a comparable level of awe?


The artist begins to answer the question by pointing out how, “when our ability to imagine visual knowledge beyond
what we see with our own eyes becomes augmented by ... technology, our imaginary vision for what is dramatic,
awesome, and sublime becomes warped by [that] technology.” Cristi Rinklin’s technique and imagery embrace and
mimic this warping by applying tools like Adobe Photoshop to distort intermediate camera snapshots of her sketches
which she uses to produce her large scale, often mixed media paintings. Transparency, airbrush, acrylic and oils are
used to create whatever visual effect Rinklin chooses to transform the space of a particular painting.


The exaggerated blurs that Rinklin produced by using Photoshop filters to expand the illusion of depth are sharply
contrasted by flat graphic shapes. In color and style these contradictions update the Baroque opulence of deep,
cloud filled heavens creating edgy, contemporary versions. Lapis blues and golden sunlight are replaced by fuchsia,
turquoise or blaze orange. Brush strokes vanish replaced by semitransparent shapes that mimic vinyl stickers and
linear details that have the illustrative feel of a graphic novel. Heavier fleshy forms morph vaporous clouds into
ambiguous, visceral anatomy. Around these shapes explosions and deep space (at times outer space) allow the
semi-organic forms and winding ribbons of color to relate to dynamic computer generated graphics of the cinema.


In addition to Tiepolo and other Italian and European masters, Rinklin references Fredrick Church and the expansive
paintings of the American Sublime to foreground her depictions of the multiple realities that an idealized landscape
represents in an era where suburban expansion threatens the existence of that landscape. The artist notes that,
“...my images present this clash of multiple realities, and the suggestion of a world constantly in flux both physically
and psychologically. In some ways, the painting itself, and all its warping and regurgitation of its antecedents
becomes a kind of metaphor for all this.”

– James Hull, Curator FP3 Gallery

Cristi Rinklin, After the end of the begining (2009)

oil and acrylic on dibond aluminum 48 x 84 inches


Oscar Palacio at FP3

Re-represented

January 23 - April 25, 2009

Download or view PDF of Press Release:Here

 

Opening Reception: Friday January 23, 6 - 9 PM

Curated by: James Hull

Address: 346 Congress Street - Lobby Level (at A Street)

(Fort Point) Boston, MA. 02210

Gallery hours: Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 12 - 7 PM , Saturday 12 - 4 PM

 

 

 

Artist's website:http://www.oscarpalacio.net/history_revisited/history_revisited.html

FP3 property website, location, directions


October 17, 2008 - January 17, 2009 ( extended one week!)

John Guthrie

Guthrie Exhibit Press Release

Gallery Press Release

Boston Globe review

Images of installation


Artist's Website: John Guthrie

Contact: James Hull

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